Creating user-defined Excel functions (UDFs) – Part 2. Improved VBA code to spell a number in a text form.

Excel UDF, custom function to spell a number.


         In the previous post, we created Excel UDF, which translates a number into a text form, using Dollar/Cents as default currency type. We strictly relied on VBA code snippet, published on Microsoft’s knowledge base. While working with this code, we now realize that several enhancements to this UDF would be desirable.

         First of all, when dealing with even amounts, we really don’t see a point of quite redundant“No Cents” message. Secondly, it appears that this code simply formats the amount specified, instead of rounding it. As an example $ 1,256.8789 will be spelled out as One Thousand Two Hundred Fifty Six Dollars and Eighty Seven Cents, but it really should be: One Thousand Two Hundred Fifty Six Dollars and Eighty Eight Cents. Next, we probably want to change our function name to reflect the fact it only translates dollar amounts, not any other currencies, nor non-currency amounts. This is definitely a matter of personal taste, but let’s call this function SpellNumberDollar and while at it, let’s change it’s input variable from MyNumber to Amount. Let’s then create a new universal UDF (SpellNumberCurrency), which could accept any currency type, instead of limiting ourselves to dollars. After all, we don’t have anything against Euros, do we? Finally, let’s write a true SpellNumber function, to spell out a non-currency number up to the third decimal point (thousandths), instead of current precision of two decimal points (hundredths.)

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Top 10 Free resources to learn Microsoft Excel

Top 10 Free resources to learn Microsoft Excel

         Students often ask me to recommend best online Excel resources for further reference. After fighting the urge to LMGTFY them 🙂 , I suggest to utilize the largest search engine in the World, and trust Google to present the most relevant results for their query. (Searching for specific terms within relevant time frame would improve your search results dramatically.)

         In addition, the second largest search engine in the World can stream very helpful How-To videos on magnitude of topics. This means that one can search YouTube to learn not only how to unclog a toilet, but also how to create a PivotChart.

         If you are in a hurry, and don’t feel like watching a 10 minute video;SlideShare comes to the rescue, and offers a plethora of presentations, including Excel tutorials. Heck, you can browse through the SlideShare version of this post below.

         That being said, some of us feel safer when using credible and trusted sources for all of our Excel needs. I started compiling the list of useful resources before YouTube and Slideshare came to existence, and added others over time. I hope that this post will satisfy your thirst for Excel knowledge. Many of these sites include tutorials, blog entries, discussion forums and YouTube videos.

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